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Upper Pengethley Farm, Sellack

Herefordshire

 

 
   
 
   

Upper Pengethley farm buildings in the 1960s

Upper Pengethley Farm was once the home farm of Pengethley Manor. In 1805 the proprietor of Pengethley was T P Symons, esq, an MP for Hereford. Symons was an agricultural innovator who introduced the drill-plough and improved the means of converting arable land to pasture.

The Pengethley estate originally comprised four farms - Little Pengethley, Upper Pengethley, Dason Farm and Grove Farm. Pengethley manor house is now a hotel. Upper Pengethley farmhouse is quite a large house and was originally built as a dower house.

Upper Pengethley Farm has been in the hands of the Partridge family since the 1920s.

The cellar of the hall of the Tudor manor house
   

Pengethley Manor and Upper Pengethley Farm on the Sellack tithe map. Houses, as apart from outbuildings, farm buildings etc, are marked red.

The farmhouse is to the east (right) of the manor and forms one side of a group of buildings around the farmyard.

Upper Pengethley Farm - Fieldwalking

On Tuesday 4th October the LOWV group continued field-walking at Upper Pengethley Farm, Sellack, looking for archaeological artefacts. Part of this field had been walked over the previous Friday (30th September) when quantities of Romano-British pottery had been found.

 

On this field-walking exercise most of the rest of this large field was covered. RB pottery was found all over the field walked, confirming the existence of a settlement, probably a farmstead, in the area. This broadly coincided with cropmarks previously recorded in the field.

 

The farmer, Mr Julian Partridge, pointed out an area which contained large quantities of slag, together with a concentration of RB pottery.

There have been very few Roman-British sites found in the project area and finding a new site is a significant step forward.

 
 

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Wye Valley History pages

maintained by Archenfield Archaeology Ltd

           

This project was part-financed by the European Union (EAGGF) and DEFRA through the Herefordshire Rivers LEADER+ Programme.